Brief Introduction to Wireless USB

2020-08-05
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Summary: Wireless USB (Wireless Universal Serial Bus) is a short-range, high-bandwidth wireless radio communication protocol. It is sometimes abbreviated as “WUSB.” Wireless USB Promoter Group created it to enhance the availability of general USB-based technologies further.

The USB Implementers Forum discouraged the practice of calling the Wireless USB as “WUSB.” Instead, it prefers to call it “Certified Wireless USB” to tell it from the “competing UWB standard.”

Development

  1. In February 2004: The Wireless USB Promoter Group was founded to define the Wireless USB protocol.
  2. In May 2005: Version 1.0 of the Wireless USB specification was announced.
  3. In June 2006: The first multi-vendor interoperability demonstration of Wireless USB emerged.
  4. In October 2006: The Host Wire Adapter (HWA) and Device Wire Adapter (DWA) wireless USB products were approved from WiQuest Communications for outdoor and indoor use.
  5. In mid-2007: The first retail product was shipped by IOGEAR.
  6. In 2008: The Wireless USB, Docking Station, was available.
  7. In August 2008: A wireless USB universal docking station was released by Kensington.
  8. On March 16, 2009: WiMedia Alliance announced the transfer agreements for the WiMedia ultra-wideband (UWB) specifications.
  9. In October 2009: The development of UWB was dropped as part of the alternative MAC/PHY, Bluetooth 3.0/High Speed technology.
  10. In September 2010: Version 1.1 of the Wireless USB specification was announced.

Connectivity

Wireless USB can form true USB systems, which are formed by devices, hosts, and interconnection support. It applies the USB hub-spoke model, where its 127 wireless devices can build point-to-point links with the host. Embedded in a working computer, the host controller is unique.

Wireless USB devices are categorized samely as traditional USB. Traditional USB hubs are not needed due to the existence of wire adapters.

How Wireless USB Works?

Wireless USB works like standard USB, but without the intermediary connector–copper wire.

For example, when pressing a key on the keyboard, that signal is broadcast as a radio wave to the receiver, which is then translated into information the computer can use.

Many devices that use Wireless USB require a small transceiver so that they can work with your computer. The transceiver plugs into a USB Type-A port and communicates with the peripheral so that your PC doesn’t need the Wi-Fi.

Q&A

Q1: What is Ultra-Wideband (UWB) technology?

A1: WUSB is a protocol launched by the USB Implementers Forum. In contrast, UWB is a general term for radio communication that uses pulses of energy.

Q2: How far can UWB signal be transmitted?

A2: The general maximum distance for UWB signal transmission is 30 feet or 10 meters.

Q3: What is the maximum bandwidth of Wireless USB’s transmission?

A3: W-USB products can transmit up to 480Mbps within a 10-foot range. After about 10 feet, it can transmit at 110Mbps.

Q4: Can the Wireless USB Hub and the Wireless USB to VGA be used at the same time?

A4: Yes. You can use them at the same time with one Wireless USB Host Adapter.

Q5: How many hosts can use a single Wireless USB Hub?

A5: Six different hosts can be accepted.

 

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